Sunday, October 14, 2012

Lincoln's White Supremacy Party ny Bernhard Thuersam

Lincoln's White Supremacy Party


The freedmen did not receive the franchise after the war because of their political maturity and judgment, the clear intent was to simply keep the Republican party in power with bloc-voting.  The Republican party's Union League organization taught the Southern black man to hate his white neighbor and vote for Northern men whose own State's practiced Jim Crow laws. Leon Litwack's 1961 book, "North of Slavery: The Negro in the Free States, 1790-1860," (Chicago, 1961) is an excellent reference for understanding racial views in the antebellum North.

Bernhard Thuersam, Chairman

North Carolina War Between the States Sesquicentennial Commission

"The Official Website of the North Carolina WBTS Sesquicentennial"

Lincoln's White Supremacy Party:

"The Republican leaders were quite aware in 1865 that the issue of Negro status and rights was closely connected with the two other great issues of Reconstruction – who should reconstruct the South and who should govern the country.  They were increasingly conscious that in order to reconstruct the South along the lines they planned they would require the support and the votes of the freedmen.

And it was apparent to some that once the reconstructed States were restored to the Union the Republicans would need the votes of the freedmen to retain control over the national government.  While they could agree on this much, they were far from agreeing on the status, the rights, the equality, or the future of the Negro.

The fact was that the constituency on which the Republican congressmen relied in the North lived in a race-conscious, segregated society devoted to the doctrine on white supremacy and Negro inferiority.

"In virtually every phase of existence," writes Leon Litwack with regard to the North in 1860, "Negroes found themselves systematically separated from whites. They were either excluded from railway cars, omnibuses, stagecoaches, and steamboats and assigned to special "Jim Crow" sections; they sat, when permitted, in secluded and remote corners of theaters and lecture halls; they could not enter most hotels, restaurants and resorts, except as servants; they prayed in "Negro pews" in the white churches….Moreover, they were often educated in segregated schools, punished in segregated prisons, nursed in segregated hospitals, and buried in segregated cemeteries."

Ninety-three per cent of the 225,000 Northern Negroes in 1860 lived in States that denied them the ballot, and 7 per cent lived in the five New England States that permitted them to vote. Ohio and New York had discriminatory qualifications that practically eliminated Negro voting.

Ohio denied them poor relief, and most States of the old Northwest had laws carrying penalties against Negroes settling in those States. Everywhere in the free States the Negro met with barriers to job opportunities, and in most places he encountered severe limitations to the protection of his life, liberty and property.

[Many Republican leaders], like Senator Lyman Trumbull of Illinois, the close friend of Lincoln, found no difficulty in reconciling antislavery with anti-Negro views.  "We, the Republican party," said Senator Trumbull in 1858," are the white man's party. We are for free white men, and for making white labor respectable and honorable, which it can never be when negro slave labor is brought into competition with it." [And] William H. Seward, who in 1860 described the American Negro as "a foreign and feeble element like the Indians, incapable of assimilation"; [and], Senator Henry Wilson of Massachusetts, who firmly disavowed any belief "in the mental or intellectual equality of the African race with this proud and domineering race of ours."

(Seeds of Failure in Radical Race Policy, C. Vann Woodward, New Frontiers of the American Reconstruction, Harold M. Hyman, editor, pp. 125-127)