Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Shoeless Southerners and a Vast New Market for Northern Goods

From: bernhard1848@att.net

The poverty of the American South complained of by FDR had been caused by the destruction and rapine wrought by Grant and Sherman's armies; it would be more accurate to state that instead of being liberated, the black race merely acquired new masters.  Those black people were already Christianized and educated in practical pursuits, but Northern emissaries would help them become consumers of Northern-made goods.

Bernhard Thuersam

Shoeless Southerners and a Vast New Market for Northern Goods

"Some years ago Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins raised the temperature of many Southerners to fever height by suggesting that if the people of that section could be persuaded to wear shoes a veritable "social revolution" would result.  The mass-production system of the United States, the secretary told a welfare council in May, 1933, depends upon purchasing power, the proper development of which would lead to prosperity beyond anything we "have ever dared to dream of."

If the wages of the millworkers of the South could be raised to such a level that they could afford shoes, a great demand for footwear would result.  Indeed, said the secretary, when it is realized that "the whole South is an untapped market for shoes" it becomes clear that great "social benefits" and "social good" would inevitably come from the development of our "mass-production system" to meet this latent consuming power.

Southern editors and speakers indignantly denied the canard that Southerners bought no shoes and retorted that such comments were only what might have been expected from a woman, especially one who knew nothing about the South.

It was even suggested that should all the inhabitants of the South suddenly wake to wearing shoes the resultant wear and tear on streets, sidewalks, and hotel carpets might cause grave financial loss to the area.

That was in 1933 . . . [and it was maintained that] Markets can only exist where there is demand; demand comes close upon the heels of knowledge.  Knowledge, or education in the ways of the West, has therefore been considered essential if "backward" peoples are to be induced to purchase western goods.  [Henry M.] Stanley, the African explorer, in an address before the Manchester Chamber of Commerce, published in 1884 [asserted] that if Christian missionaries should clothe naked Negroes of the Congo, even in one dress for use on the Sabbath, "320,000,000 yards of Manchester cotton cloth" would be required . . . Should they become sufficiently educated in the European moral code to feel the necessity for a change of clothing every day, cloth to the value of [26 million pounds] a year would be necessary.

When the natives have been educated they would abandon their idleness and sloth, [John Williams, missionary to Tahiti said in 1817], and become industrious workers.  Then, he asserted, they will apply to our merchants for goods . . . "

[When FDR called for a New Deal in the South] He certainly must have been aware of the implications of the thesis that the poorly housed, undernourished, and ill-clad Southerner must be given greatly increased purchasing power to enable him to better his economic condition, thus strengthening the demand for manufacture products and consequently improving the economy of the nation as a whole.

It is also certain that the concern which Secretary Perkins felt for the shoeless Southerner was not without precedent.  When the armies of Grant and Sherman liberated the Southern Negro, the economic implications were not lost on the people of the victorious section. Following in the wake of the Union armies a host of teachers and missionaries flocked to the South, determined to Christianize and educate the freed Negro . . .  with a decidedly abolitionist tinge, to be sure.

[These] people, their robes of self-righteousness wrapped firmly around them . . . carried with them the New England school, complete with curriculum, texts and method, but they also took with them the attitudes and beliefs of the social reformer and, specifically, the militant abolitionist.  Politically, the teachers and missionaries became the tools of the [Republican] Radicals in their program of reconstruction . . .

Sensing in the alphabet and the book the key to the white man's position of dominance, the open-sesame which would unlock the magic door of equality and wealth, the Negro, like the Polynesian, flocked to the church and the  school.  As one observer wrote, the "spelling book and primer" seemed to them Alladin's [sic] lamp, which will command over all the riches and glory of the world.  In brief, they believed that education was "the white man's fetich," which would guarantee wealth, power, and social position.

Some of the teachers [and missionaries] understood the inevitable result of the extension of freedom, Christianity, and education to the Negro – the development of a vast new market for northern goods, which would result in great profits to northern mills."

(Northern Interest in the Shoeless Southerner, Henry L. Swint; Journal of Southern History, Volume XVI, Number 4, November 1950, pp. 457-462)